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The Copenhagen-based collective Sara, Peter & Tobias, winners of the International Photography Award 2018, will be showing their award-winner series The Merge, at the British Journal of Photographys’ International Photography Award  (BJP IPA) 2018 exhibition, opening with the PV on Thursday 12th July 2018 at TJ Boulting.

Metro Imaging was delighted to once again work with the BJP and TJ Boutling, sponsoring the exhibition with the full production of all C-type prints and bespoke frames for the show.

The Merge explores and visually interprets the possibility that our reality does not exist as we believe it to, but that instead, we live in a simulation. Could it be that our world is just a construct – a created illusion?

The Merge visually entertains the simulation theory. It artistically investigates what consequences supercomputers, artificial intelligence and robots have on our future society. By looking at interactions between man and machine it explores how this accelerated digitized paradigm will affect our emotional, social and moral norms.

The project employs an array of photographic tools to document human existence as we move rapidly towards a point in history where physical and digital worlds will become so intertwined, that it will be impossible to distinguish between the two. The time is now for documenting how the revolution of artificial intelligence and robotics is rapidly changing our world, real or not.

The Merge aims to debate the subject’s complexity and the images balance between realism and imagination, leaving space for multiple interpretations and engaging a dialogue with the audience about the landscape of our future: If life is a simulation, where should we look to understand the world we live in?

 

Private View: Thursday 12th July 2018, 6.30 – 8.30pm

Exhibition continues: 13th July – 11th August

TJ Boulting Gallery

59 RIDING HOUSE STREET
LONDON W1W 7EG

Create your printed portrait at our usual prices and we will provide packaging, labelling and delivery to ensure a smooth Round II application process and peace of mind.  See our full info below…

BESPOKE PRINTING OFFER

Come in to our Central London lab with your file and you can spend 15 minutes with one of our expert technicians. We’ll tweak your image until you’re perfectly happy, and print the file to your required size. Alternatively send your file remotely and we’ll ensure to print them optimally

Choose either Digital C-type, Fine Art Giclée or Genuine Black & White prints and we will carefully set it in a protective sleeve, label it for you and deliver it to the address specified for entries.

BESPOKE PREMIER / STANDARD PRINTS: These include Digital C-type, Giclée, Black & White. Prints “must be no larger than 1015 x 760mm and 20 kilos in weight (there are no limitations on how small a work can be).The image may be smaller than the paper size.” (See all Taylor Wessing Photography Portrait Prize 2018 T&C’s HERE).

FILE DEADLINE: last day and time of print operator appointments or to send files will be Tuesday 10th July 2018 12pm

ORDERING: For ordering via contact our production team here by to call us on 020 7865 0000 or email enquiries@metroimaging.co.uk.

DELIVERY: We will then Sleeve, label and deliver directly to the London judging venue for July 13th for an added £10 +VAT

BESPOKE PRINTING: More info on Bespoke (Premier and Standard) Service can be found here

TURNAROUND TIMES: Please be aware of ALL our turnaround times before placing your order on either the Bespoke or Self-Service options.

LABEL: Please make sure all your label information is correct to ensure a smooth Round 2 application process.

RETURN PRINTS: We cannot return any prints to you after they have been submitted for entry. Please contact NPG directly for more info on collecting your work.

 

 

How will women be remembered over the past 100 years? What have they achieved in the fields of Sport, Science, Politics, the Arts and Education? Who were these women and what did they look like?

Renowned photographer Anita Corbin aims to answer these questions with her symbolic project ‘First Women‘, exhibiting at Royal College of Art this summer.

This considerable body of work comprises a unique collection of 100 portraits capturing women in the UK who were “first” in their field of achievement. The portraits by Anita provide inspiration and insight for a new generation of women seeking an understanding of their own roles in a rapidly changing world in which equality is still an issue. The full collection is finally being revealed this year to mark 100 years of women’s suffrage.

After working with Metro on her 2016 exhibition Visible Girls, Anita was keen to seek advice on the First Women project from Metro’s Director Steve Macleod and Marketing Manager, Kate O’Neill.  Anita comments “Their (Metro’s) dedicated team of experts have a huge range of industry experience and they clearly love what they do, which is why the quality is so good – I can totally rely on them”.

“From our first project with Anita working on Visible Girls to this landmark body of ‘100 First Women’, our partnership has progressed and grown into a collaboration beyond what we could have ever hoped for. We look forward to creating many more projects with Anita and adding to the Metro Imaging legacy of high quality and close collaboration with our clients.” – Kate O’Neill says of the ongoing partnership with Anita and First Women.

Steve Macleod adds  “This project embodies Anita’s huge dedication and determination to her craft in collating these portraits which are emblematic of the commitment to her practise or process.”

Working closely with Anita over the last year, our experienced technicians have helped to produce this landmark exhibition via archival digital c-type matt prints, custom mounting and bespoke framing.

First Women, The Collection, is about women’s achievements, and one woman’s exploration through the camera lens that endeavours to answer the question: How will women be remembered over the past 100 years? What have they achieved in the fields of Sport, Science, Politics, the Arts and Education? And who were these remarkable “first” women, what did they look like?

The portraits are multi-tiered; they are an exploration of the relationship between the photographer and the sitter as well as the relationship the woman has with the environment or background in which she is photographed. Each has been carefully chosen by Anita and her subject to reflect the field of achievement in which the woman has excelled.

First Women is the project that Anita has waited all her life to create. Her passion was born out of work she began in the early eighties – her Visible Girls portfolio was symbolic of women’s newfound freedom to be whoever they wanted to be – and fired by years spent working as a top female photographer for The Sunday Times and The Observer when she was often sent to cover “human interest” stories involving women.

All this experience has culminated in Anita’s vision – the creation of a legacy for future generations of women to enable them to understand and appreciate the achievements of their forebears – and perhaps even to laugh incredulously that once upon a time women were regarded as second-class citizens without a vote.

 

The exhibition launches this July at the Royal College of Art (info below) and you can get involved and support this remarkable project here!

 

 

The exhibition of the full 100 portraits shows at the Dyson Gallery, Royal College of Art, Riverside, 1 Hester Road London SW11 4AN 20th July until 22nd August.

Every day of the week 12-5pm. Free Entry.

 

 

IMG © Anita Corbin / First Women

1. Kelly Gallagher, First Woman to win British Winter Paralympic gold

2. Nicola Adams MBE, First Woman win British Olympic and European Games boxing gold

3. Suzi Quatro, First Woman to play bass in and front a Glam Rock Band

4. Rev Rose Hudson Wilkin, First Woman to be made the Speaker’s Chaplain

Come down to explore our South London workshop, and join us for a framing and curating coffee morning. Meet the experts behind every piece we create and discover cost-effective and archival solutions for finishing, preserving and installing artworks.

We will also be joined by our industry partners, TAGSMART – pioneers in digital tagging, authentication and certification services in the Art Market.

Through live demonstrations, gain tips on curating and exhibiting over coffee and refreshments. Plus, get a chance to win a £250 voucher for our Mounting and Framing services.

We’re looking forward to your visit!

Event Details:

Tuesday 3rd July
11 am – 1 pm

Metro Framing HQ
106 Tinworth Street
Vauxhall, London
SE11 5EQ

To join us, RSVP here

Join us on Wednesday June 20th for an afternoon of

Rediscovered Photographs at Calvert 22 Foundation.

 

WHAT?

Print swap, exhibition tour, and portfolio review with The Calvert Journal and Metro Imaging.

We’ll begin with a curator’s tour of the exhibition Family Values: Polish Photography Now, the first major exhibition dedicated to Polish photography in the UK, which amplifies themes of identity, home and family in the context of social and political change.

The tour will be followed by a print swap introduced by Kate O’Neill of Metro Imaging. The print swap’s theme is “Rediscovered Photographs”, inspired by the work of the photographers in the Family Values exhibition.

A group career review session with award winning photographer Owen Harvey and Kate O’Neill, Marketing and Partnerships Manager at Metro Imaging, will follow.

Finally, you’ll have the chance to participate in one-on-one portfolio review sessions with editors of The Calvert Journal.

WHEN?

2pm – 5pm Wednesday 20th June 2018.

WHERE?

Calvert 22 Foundation, 22 Calvert Avenue, London E2 7JP

REQUIREMENTS?

Attendees must book a space and bring along one of their own photographic prints that fits the theme “Rediscovered Photographs”. It can be an image from their own personal archive of work; one that never made the final cut for a series or project; one that had been forgotten about; a mistake (happy or otherwise) that was kept regardless; or a photograph that otherwise fits the theme. Your photo can be as large or as small as you like, but we recommend prints around 10″ x 8″ or 10″ x 12″ in size.

Your photo can be an already existing print, or you can order one via Metro Imaging Self-Service and receive 20% off any paper and print size. A discount code will be provided to you once you book your place. You can order your prints here.

BOOKING?

Entry is free but there are a limited number of spaces, so be sure to book your place here!

Getty Images Gallery announces Beat Positive, a new exhibition which will bring to life the dawn of hip-hop culture in a series of vibrant photographs available as fine art prints. The exhibition showcases iconic images from British photographers Janette Beckman and David Corio alongside never before seen material from the Michael Ochs, Right On! and Redferns archives.

Now one of the biggest selling musical genres globally, hip-hop began with a much simpler goal: to get people moving. On the evening of August 11, 1973, Clive Campbell, better known as DJ Kool Herc, set up two turntables in the recreation room at 1520 Sedgewick Ave in the Bronx in order to entertain the crowd gathered for his sister Cindy’s birthday party. In a completely new technique he called the Merry Go-Round, Herc extended short drum breaks, now known as breakbeats, using two copies of the same records. The crowd went wild, the party went late, and though no one at the time was aware, a new genre was born.

Londoners Janette Beckman and David Corio first discovered hip-hop in 1982 while on assignment for music magazines such as NME, Melody Maker, and The Face. Their portraits of Run DMC, Slick Rick, Salt ‘n’ Pepa, Whodini, Grandmaster Flash, LL Cool J, Queen Latifah and the Beastie Boys, along with many others, are considered classics of the genre. Their work has been shown internationally at museums and galleries such as the Victoria and Albert Museum, The Museum of the City of New York and Powerhouse Gallery.

Using the four main elements of hip-hop – turntablism, MC’ing, graffiti writing, and breakdancing – as a jumping off point, Getty Images Gallery curator Shawn Waldron worked with the two photographers to create a unique offering of limited edition prints. The show also features never-before-seen historic photographs sourced from Getty Images’ extensive archive, including images of a young LL Cool J, a triptych of The Fat Boys filming their ‘Jail House Rap’ video and the 1984 Hip Hop Jam at London’s Southbank, taken from the Michael Ochs, Right On! and Redferns archives respectively.

Working closely with the Getty Images Gallery team, Metro produced both digital black & white fibre prints along with digital c-type matt prints for this new exhibition of vintage work, which is on show now until 4th August 2018.

Images from the exhibition are available for purchase as prints, starting at £75, with global delivery options. The Getty Images Gallery will also be producing a 1980s style fanzine also called Beat Positive that will be available for purchase exclusively through the Gallery.

 

IMG ©  Getty Images
1. Stetsasonic – The group Stetsasonic poses on a Brooklyn, New York sidewalk, 1988 Photo by Janette Beckman/Getty Images
2. NEW YORK – 1989: (L-R) Rapper Flavor Flav, director Spike Lee and Chuck D of the rap group ‘Public Enemy’ film a video for their song ‘Fight The Power’ directed by Spike Lee in 1989 in New York, New York. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
3. American hip hop duo Eric B. (right) and Rakim walking across 14th Street in New York City, circa 1989. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
4. Beastie Boys and Run-DMC performing on stage at the Greek Theatre, Los Angeles, 21st June 1987. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

This month sees ‘Tish Murtha: Works 1976 – 1991’ exhibited at The Photographers’ Gallery, London. This unique exhibition, which charts the remarkable accomplishments of documentary photographer Tish Murtha, also offers a tender and frank perspective on a historic moment of social deprivation and instability in Britain.

In 1976, aged 20, Tish Murtha left Newcastle upon Tyne to study at the influential School of Documentary Photography at Newport College of Art under the guidance of Magnum photographer David Hurn. The earliest series in this show, Newport Pub, dates from this period – where Murtha photographed the realities of everyday life for the regulars of a typical public house, ‘The New Found Out’ in a deprived area.

Murtha felt a genuine sense of obligation to the communities of her home in the North East and had chosen a course of study which would make her a more effective photographer, one who could highlight the social disadvantages that she herself had suffered.

To honour Murtha’s ethos the exhibition, co-curated by Val Williams and Gordon MacDonald, with Karen McQuaid, surveys six major bodies of work; Newport Pub (1976/78); Elswick Kids (1978); Juvenile Jazz Bands (1979); Youth Unemployment (1980); London by Night (1983) and Elswick Revisited (1987 – 1991) using both vintage and contemporary prints. In addition, the exhibition will also include personal letters and ephemeral material from the Tish Murtha Archive.

Metro Imaging have had the privilege of working with Tish’s daughter Ella Murtha over the past year, initially digitising part of the archive and then printing for this retrospective show. Ella chose silver gelatin black and white fibre prints to emulate and reference her mother’s way of working.

‘Tish Murtha: Works 1976 – 1991’ will open at The Photographers’ Gallery on June 15th alongside Alex Prager: Silver Lake Drive, a mid-career survey of American photographer and filmmaker, Alex Prager.

 

IMAGES © Tish Murtha Archive, with thanks to Ella Murtha

“Hospital Rooms aims to disrupt the barriers that limit access to art and culture for people using secure and locked mental health services.”

We catch-up with founders of Hospital Rooms, Niamh White and Tim Shaw, and discuss their mission to give meaning to visual art in care units.

Can you tell us why you founded Hospital rooms and how it all came about?

We founded Hospital Rooms after a close friend was sectioned under the mental health act and when we visited her, the unit was bleak and clinical. It was not at all conducive to recovery or rejuvenation and we were shocked that this was where she was at a time when she was so vulnerable. Our background is in the arts (Tim is an artist and Niamh is a curator). Together we thought that we could change these spaces by bringing artists into them. We’ve learned a lot over the last 2 years and we’ve now developed a really meaningful co-production process where fantastic world class artists work in close collaboration with patients and clinical teams to reimagine what a mental health unit could be. We’re also delivering arts workshops in the units to make creative activity more available to patients. Some people are aspiring artists with abundant talents, some are encountering art for the first time and exploring what it can mean for them. We aim to not only improve the environment, but to disrupt the barriers that people face in accessing art and culture and in doing so bring about a sense of social connectedness and inclusion for some of our most vulnerable.

We think that our latest project at Eileen Skellern 1 Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) for women at Maudsley Hospital, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust demonstrated the gold standard of multi disciplinary collaboration from our team, the clinical staff, the artists and our partners. In PICU, the environment is intensively managed to keep patients safe and aid recovery.

We were offered the necessary support to not let that compromise the ambitiousness of an artists vision or scale of work. The staff provided all the correct conditions to support patient engagement and were adventurous in the measures they were willing to take to facilitate artists, whether that meant making extra staff available or leaders encouraging their teams and giving advice.

 

How do artists get involved and work with Hospital Rooms?

We think very carefully about the artists that we invite to participate in Hospital Rooms projects. In the first instance they must have a level of professional expertise that equips them to deal with all of the regulations and restrictions we face in meeting NHS compliancy around robustness, infection control and ligature risk – this includes not having any framing, glazing, screws, free standing items or canvas. In addition, we need them to have a collaborative aspect to their practice so that they are able to engage with the communities we work with, listen to them, lead sessions with them and interpret their thoughts and ideas in imaginative ways. We also try to reflect the groups we work with for example, if it’s a women’s ward, we may think is it important to work with majority women artists. In addition, we are keen to work with artists who have used the mental health system or have a connection to it. It is important that that some of the artists are able to draw on personal experience when creating their work.

We are approached regularly by artists who would like to work with us and we’re always thrilled to hear from people. At present, our projects take place relatively slowly and so we only commission a certain number per year. As we grow, that will change!

 

How do you measure the impact Hospital Rooms has on the institutions and organisations you work with?

We have a range of methods to measure the impact of our work and we’re constantly working on improving them. We monitor people’s experiences before, during and after a project takes place. This is usually with the support of the clinical teams we work with. We’ve also ventured into creative means of evaluating our work. We’ve lead collage workshops with images of the ward environment,  artworks and text and asked patients to reflect on their experience through a piece of their own work. We’ve also used creative methods with staff such as a ‘Visual Matrix’, which aids conversation and brings about some rich reflections on the project.

 

You’ve been working closely with the Metro Imaging team for some of the installations and exhibitions, how do you find the production process and are the environments you work in challenging for installing artworks?

The environments we are working in are some of the most challenging clinical spaces. It took us 18 months to convince the first hospital to work with us because the general belief was that it just couldn’t be done. From the very beginning, Metro has worked with offered us amazing support in achieving both museum quality prints that are also suitable for these spaces, being wipe clean, scratch proof and do not need glazing or framing. Many of our other artists have worked in close collaboration with Steve and Simon to meet those goals and we were thrilled with the results they achieved. This was particularly relevant for the work of Anish Kapoor and Tamsin Relly, where all parties undertook numerous tests as they were not willing to compromise on quality for this community. Steve Macleod (Metro Imaging Director) was one of the artists on our first project, and he created a series of beautiful landscapes that were printed on dibond and vinyl. It’s inspirational.

 

What is the next project for you?

We have just met our funding target for a new project at a locked male rehabilitation ward in London.

We’ve recently received a great deal of press coverage, including a feature on Channel 4 News, and in response we’ve been inundated with requests from mental health units who wish to work with us. We are upping our game and working on increasing our impact and reach!

 

Are the artworks from Hospital Rooms projects available to purchase?

Ordinarily the artworks created for Hospital Rooms are specifically made for the units we work in and are not available to purchase. However, we have just released our very first limited edition print by Tamsin Relly, that was printed by Metro. It is a beautifully luscious scene of green forest with vibrant pink flowers, and proceeds from the sale go towards our most urgent upcoming work. These are available to buy through the Hospital Rooms website: www.hospital-rooms.com

 

How else can people support Hospital Rooms?

The key way that people can support Hospital Rooms is through fundraising. The need for our work is so apparent and our projects reach some of the most vulnerable members of our society. From partnerships with businesses, personal fundraising events, regular donors or sponsored activities, every penny helps us to continue our work to bring brilliant art to those who face the biggest barriers to access it.

 

Hospital Rooms are in residency on our Instagram gallery all this week (29th May – 3rd June), follow us to see more from this incredible organisation and their wonderful artists.

IMG © Hospital Rooms  / Projects

 

Overhaul brings together artists Rhiannon Adam, Natasha Caruana, and Laura Pannack to transform a derelict terraced house in Peckham. Metro Imaging are pleased to work with both Rhiannon Adam and Laura Pannack, producing 11 Duratran prints for the show; this collaborative project is exhibiting all new and unseen work at Safehouse 1, as part of Peckham 24, 2018.

The exhibition explores the collision of collaboration, science, and research led enquiries drawing from The Peckham Experiment (1926-1950); a revolutionary initiative set-up to study rising concerns over health and well-being. The initiative worked with 950 local families living within one mile of the experiment’s base, the Pioneer Health Centre, St Mary’s Road, Peckham.

Working together, Laura Pannack and Rhiannon Adam open their sketchbook to share their process, using experimental analogue processes to assess how we diagnose and define health. As part of the Peckham Experiment, member families would subject themselves to an annual health overhaul, in which biological samples would be collected alongside psychological assessments. Pannack and Adam have recruited families living within the Experiment’s boundaries to take part in the project, inviting them to contribute their image and samples. The analogue film has then been immersed in the samples prior to development, creating a unique and unpredictable biological imprint of each participant. The project explores the notion of portraiture – capturing an essence of the unseen, playfully suggesting ways in which the image can contribute to self-discovery. Their findings discuss the never-ending search for absolute health.

Also featured is the work of Natasa Caruana, plus a series of images created during a one-day group assignment with recruited participants from the photography community.

 

Opening Party and Special Events as part of Peckham 24 Festival: 

Friday 6pm – 11pm
Saturday 10am – 7pm
Sunday 10am – 6pm

Safehouse 1, 139 Copeland Road, London, SE15 3SN

 

IMG © Laura Pannack

“Within the vast disaster area, the boundaries between the city and nature had been shattered right in front of my eyes. I was forced to think about the inevitable limitations of photography and how impossible it is to record all of actual reality” – Taisuke Koyama

Metro are excited to be working with Seen Fifteen for Taisuke Koyama solo exhibition, SENSOR CODE  which opens as part of Peckham 24 Festival on Friday 18th May 2018. Working closely with the gallery, our team produced a set of bespoke frames for this unique body of work.

For this new exhibition, Koyama will present abstract photographic works from four recent projects, which employ experimental strategies using digital sensors. The reactions of light onto the sensors in digital cameras and scanners resolve into unique colours and patterns, which in turn create Koyama’s own visual language. Releasing abstract photography from its heritage in materiality is an ongoing area of interest for the artist. So too is a paradoxical desire to design installations that become a physical experience.

The works at Seen Fifteen will be presented as large inkjet prints, suspended from the ceiling in a maze of sculptural images for the viewer to journey around. In our contemporary world, where we are completely saturated by a never-ending stream of digitally transmitted images, the artist’s intention within the gallery space is to invoke a contradictory sensation. By dominating the room with large-scale prints he aims to force us to feel the images as well as look at them.

Opening Party and Special Events as part of Peckham 24 Festival: Friday 18 May 2018, 6pm-2am Seen Fifteen, B Stairs, The Bussey Building, 133 Copeland Road, London SE15 3SN

IMG © Taisuke Koyama

Metro is delighted to be collaborating with Michael Hoppen Gallery to produce bespoke framing and mounting for Tim Walker’s ‘The Gully Queens‘ to be shown at Photo London 2018.

The Gully Queens Jamaica, 2018 – is an exclusive limited edition of 30 signed prints with all proceeds (100%) donated to the Gully Queens Charity

“I found the notion of an aggression towards homosexuality in Jamaica sad and regressive. To me, the Gully Queens are emblematic of this injustice which is what led me to photograph them.” – Tim Walker says of this particular work.

Pop by the Michael Hoppen Gallery Stand C1 at Photo London fair to see this beautiful piece on show and chat with their wonderful team.

IMG © Tim Walker

The Gully Queens:

Health, Safety and Housing concerns continue to go unaddressed for a subset of the Homeless & Displaced LGBT persons who reside across Jamaica. Many have resided in the storm drains of the business district known as New Kingston have also repeatedly been displaced by the police and city council. They continue to be engaged in sex work as a means of survival which increases their health risk as higher paying clients often demand unprotected sex. There is also an increase in the use of alcohol and illicit drugs (shown by 85% of respondents who use alcohol and illicit drugs to suppress their depression) which can be sources of vulnerability. 99% of the clientele have indicated that their drug and alcohol use significantly affects their practice of safe sex.

The Gully Queens have both physical and mental scars as evidence of trying to survive on Jamaica’s volatile streets. Because they do not conform to gender norms, they have been disowned by family, threatened, stoned, attacked, and even shot. They are repeatedly evicted from spaces where they have sought refuge, and arsonists often set fire to their belongings. They are nomadic, and have in some cases have developed dysfunctional behavior as means of survival, disrupting the broader communities where they live. The majority express the desire for stability, and the need to see hope for the future.

Since 2015, the Gully Queens Charity has been able to secure a series of small grants that have allowed short-term/ emergency interventions by taking many of the homeless LGBT community off the streets. Larry Chang Foundation’s program is designed to reduce premature death and restore hope within our clientele by providing:

– Shelter; providing safe shelter in various models (group housing or independent living)

– Improve Health Outcomes; individualised care plans, meals that support diet plans & access to and retention in discrimination free healthcare

– Psychosocial support & Life Skills Training; Provide access to counselling sessions (group and one-on-one) based on care plans as well as Empowerment sessions utilising ‘you empowerment GPA’ model

– Improve Employability; remedial educational programmes, employability workshops, and readiness seminars & documentation such identification, TRN etc

 

A new major exhibition London Nights opens at the Museum of London this month, in which the diversity of the city of London after dark is explored, through both contemporary and historic imagery, ranging from the late 19th century to the present day.

Split into three sections the exhibition focuses on London Illuminated, which showcases the variety of ways in which photographers have been inspired by and captured the aesthetic of the city at night, depicting London illuminated by limited natural and artificial light in contrast to the familiar daytime.

Dark Matters explores the mysterious, unknown and potentially uncomfortable – the darker side of the city. In this section, visitors will be immersed in imagery relating to night-walking, the blackout of the Blitz, isolation, threat, and vulnerability.

The final section Switch On…Switch Off…focuses on Londoners at work, rest and play in the city after dark. From the familiar commute home, the quick change of pace as office workers head out for the night or as workers commence their night shift

The diverse exhibition features immersive film plus over 200 images from more than 50 artists, including lesser known and emerging photographers to the more established and recognised Bill Brandt, Alvin Langdon Coburn and Rut Blees Luxemburg.

Metro is delighted to have been involved, producing C-type and Black & White fibre prints and scanning images for photographers who have work featured in the exhibition: Will Eckersley’s 2011 series ‘Dark City’, images from the late Tish Murtha’s 1983 project, ‘London By Night’ and Marc Vallée’s 2016 project, ‘Vandals in the City’.

There will also be a range of programmed events happening at the museum in relation to the exhibition including evening, weekday and weekend workshops and events. Further information can be found here.

 

Museum of London, 150 London Wall, London EC2Y 5HN

Exhibition dates: 11th May – 11th November 2018

Opening times: 10:00am – 6:00pm (galleries close at 5.40pm)

Admission starts at £10.  Book here.

 

Image 1 © Marc Vallée

Image 2 © Tish Murtha

 

Iconic Images will exhibit its full roster of world-renowned photographers at Photo London, showcasing images that have never been exhibited before, including vintage works by pioneering British photographers Terry O’Neill and Norman Parkinson. O’Neill chronicled the rise of youth culture in the 60s, charting emerging rock and roll bands before working with the biggest names in and cinema, from the 60s to present day.

Metro has been privileged to work with Iconic on both over the years, producing a range of fine art gicléedigital c-types and true black and white prints for a variety of exhibitions and collections.

Don’t miss these rare and vintage photographs at G22 and F14 at Photo London at Somerset House from May 17th – 20th.

Other iconic works featured include Douglas Kirkland, Milton Greene, Markus Klinko, Jerry Schatzberg, John Swannell, Terence Donovan, Gered Mankowitz and Norman Seeff.

IMG: Terry O’Neill signing large Fibre limited edition prints at Metro Imaging.

Next week Leica Studio Mayfair will host the book launch and corresponding exhibition for the poignant series Photographers Against Wildlife Crime. This collective body of work will feature a selection of fine art giclée prints produced with the team here Metro Imaging.

Founded by Britta Jaschinski and Keith Wilson, Photographers Against Wildlife Crime™ are an international group of award-winning photographers that have joined forces to use their powerful and iconic images to help bring an end to the illegal wildlife trade in our lifetime.

The exhibition is running from May 14 to June 7, at the Leica Studio Mayfair and will officially launch on the 18th of May, 2018.  For all further info and trailer to the series of work see:   www.photographersagainstwildlifecrime.com

Photographers Against Wildlife Crime™ are:

Adam Oswell • Adrian Steirn • Brent Stirton • Brian Skerry • Britta Jaschinski • Bruno D’Amicis • Charlie Hamilton James • Chris Packham • Daniel Beltra • Jim Brandenburg • Jo-Anne McArthur • Karl Ammann • Klaus Nigge • Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols • Neil Aldridge • Ole J Liodden • Olly & Suzi • Patrick Brown • Paul Hilton • Peter Chadwick • Steve Winter • Sudhir Shivaram • Tony Wu • Zheng Xiaoqun • Writer: Keith Wilson

IMG 1 © Adrian Steirn

IMG 2 © Olly & Suzi

 

This week the Chelsea based, contemporary art gallery Box Galleries are launching FAME – their exclusive collection of unseen photographs by Andy Gotts,  alongside a classic collection of icons by Terry O Neill and Douglas Kirkland.

Metro have been privileged to work with all three of these iconic photographers over the years, producing a range of fine art giclée, digital c-types and true black and white prints for a variety of exhibitions and collections.

Andy Gotts MBE MA is most noted for his black and white portraits of Hollywood actors and singers. Since 1990 Gotts’ work has been published internationally and has appeared in many magazines, including French Vogue, GQ and Vanity Fair.

The National Portrait Gallery holds a selection of his photographs in their permanent collection and in 2009 Gotts was honoured with the presentation of the Fox Talbot Award.

FAME will show at Box Galleries between 10-31st May 2018, with the private view held 6pm on Thursday 10th May.

IMG © ANDY GOTTS

With the count down to Photo London 2018 in full swing we look at some highlights and ‘must-sees’ at this years fair.

THE WORK

Hala -Steve Macleod, Black Box Projects

“The longer we stare at nothing, the more chance that something will appear to us, creating an unfathomable aura and thoughtful meaning.” – Steve Macleod says of new series Hala, a project inspired by photographs captured by British explorer Sir Wilfred Thesiger. This new body of work documents the vast landscape of the Al Hajar Peninsula in the United Arab Emirates, one of the most desolate and inhospitable areas in the region. The mountain range offers a true vision of wilderness; empty and devoid of human presence.

Hala will be shown for the first time as part of Photo London with Black Box Projects  and include limited edition fine art Giclée prints produced here at Metro Imaging on both Hahnemühle Photo Rag and German Etching papers.

THE ARTIST

Steve Macleod is a British landscape photographer whose career has spanned over 20 years. He shoots on a large-format camera, using nature to share the conceptual impact and influence it can have on our emotions; our health and our imagination

THE GALLERY

Black Box Projects specialises in contemporary photography and contemporary art that is created using photographic materials. The gallery is committed to working with artists who push the limits of traditional photographic practice. The gallery does not keep a permanent space, instead it arranges pop-up exhibitions in order to tailor the experience to the individual needs of the artist and the work.

“For Photo London 2018, Black Box Projects presents Steve Macleod’s latest series and the UK debut of ‘Hala’. Shot in the United Arab Emirates between 2015-2017, it is the first time Macleod has published work taken outside of the UK. The series is printed as archival inkjet on highly textured watercolour paper giving the works a painterly style reminiscent of early Japanese watercolours and a tactile quality that harks back to Pictorialist aesthetic values.” – Black Box Projects on Macleod’s series Hala.

Check out ‘Hala’ with The Black Box Projects at Photo London in the Discovery section of the fair form May 17th – May 20th at Somerset House.

 

ALL IMAGES © Steve Macleod

Ahead of Photo London 2018 we’re highlighting some of the work by our wonderful clients showing at Somerset House this May.

THE WORK

Dazzle Site Installation for ‘On the Heights’ – Tom Lovelace

Late last year the ‘On the Heights’ exhibition showcased new work by four artists; from Miriam Austin, Sam Belinfante, Tom Lovelace and Frances Scot. The work was produced when all four artists were invited to spend two weeks living and working at Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) in April 2017.

The work explores the history, stories and landscape of the area, presenting a new dialogue between nature and experimental contemporary art practice for visitors to explore whilst extending YSP’s history of building relationships with and supporting young and emerging artists through the visiting artist programme.

Metro worked with Tom Lovelace producing C-Type prints for part of his installation which sensitively considers the extraordinary setting of YSP.  Considering slippages in the manipulated landscape, Tom’s work prompts moments of uncertainty and doubt across various locations in the Park.

For this years Photo London, Flowers Gallery will be exhibiting some of Lovelace’s work from YSP as part of their fair program.

 

THE ARTIST

Tom Lovelace lives and works in London. He studied Photography at the Arts University Bournemouth, receiving First Class Honours before studying Art History at Goldsmiths College, University of London. Lovelace works at the intersection of photography, performance and sculpture. His practice is grounded in a reinvention of everyday objects, materials and processes.

In 2015, Lovelace was nominated for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize, Foam Paul Huf Award and the Prix Pictet Award. He has exhibited across Britain, Europe and the United States. Recent exhibitions include Groundwork (New Art Centre, Salisbury 2015), Mirage Valley (Lendi Projects, Switzerland 2015), To Camera (Golden Thread Gallery, Belfast 2015), This Way Up (Flowers Gallery, London 2015), Against Nature (London Art Fair, 2015), Project 05 (Contemporary Art Society, London 2014), Ristruttura (Project B Gallery, Milan 2012) and Uncommon Ground (Flowers Gallery, London 2012).

THE GALLERY

Established in 1970 by Angela Flowers, Flowers Gallery has two London exhibition spaces in Mayfair and Shoreditch along with a New York Gallery in Chelsea. Flowers Gallery currently represents 48 international artists working across a diverse range of media, with a dedicated photography space, established in 2008, recognised for its engagement with important socio-cultural, political and environmental themes.

 

ALL IMG © TOM LOVELACE

Next week sees the launch of photographer James Hopkirk’s      ‘South London Stories’ at the Ace of Clubs, a centre supporting the homeless and vulnerable in south London.

Hopkirks’ project investigates the human cost of austerity on Lambeth, telling local stories that highlight national issues. He will be featuring seven or eight stories relating to austerity, one of which will be about the fantastic Glass Door’s winter shelter and another about the good work done by the wonderful team at Ace of Clubs.

Metro Imaging was delighted to produce digital c-type matt prints for this compelling exhibition and provide support via our online self-service.

“The issues I explore are not unique to south London. What’s happening here is affecting communities all over the UK. But this is my community, and in the course of producing this work I’ve encountered hardship that I simply didn’t realise still existed in this country, let alone on my doorstep.

At the same time, I’ve found countless examples of extraordinary kindness, of people – friends, family, neighbours, volunteers, support workers – going to enormous lengths to help others, sometimes when they themselves are barely getting by.

With the stories I publish here I want to offer a view of London that is seldom seen, and feature voices that are often ignored.”  Says James of his ongoing project.

The launch at Ace of Clubs on 10 May, 6-9PM will feature the full exhibition and the chance to explore the facilities at the centre along with Q&A with manager Sarah about homelessness and the work they do.

RSVP: Email james@southlondonstories.com you will then be be sent further details and added to the guest list.

The exhibition will also be open on Saturday 12 May from 12-5pm when you can just turn up.

ALL IMAGES © JAMES HOPKIRK

With Photo London 2018 just around the corner, we look at the photography and artists to visit at these years fair and satellite events.

THE WORK

‘Black Palms’ by Karine Laval

One of the highlights for us last year was working with   Crane Kalman Gallery again and producing these bespoke grey floating box-frames for Karine Laval’s ‘Black Palms’ prints.

THE ARTIST

Born in Paris, Karine Laval currently lives and works in New York. Educated at the University of La Sorbonne and the University of ASSAS in Paris, she studied communication and journalism, and completed her education with photography and design courses at Cooper Union, SVA and the New School of New York.

Since the beginning of her career, Laval has alternated agency and magazine commissions and publications (Here is New York 2002) with an artistic practice, that combines portraiture of personalities from the cultural world with images of geographical locations (France, Norway, Portugal, Cuba) and visual narratives.

Her photographs are notably spontaneous and reminiscent of the photographs of masters such as Henri Cartier-Bresson or William Eggleston, with whom she shares a similar use of colour as an expressive tool.

THE GALLERY

Crane Kalman Brighton has been established to provide an affordable introduction for anyone interested to buy, and possibly, collect photography. Crane Kalman Brighton sells a wide range of work from the best young local talent to some of contemporary photography’s leading lights.

Visit Crane Kalman at Photo London 2018 and see some of Karine’s latest works on show.

 

 

 

Metro is excited to be collaborating with our friends at The Old Bank Vault (TOBV) again for an exclusive photography and textile exhibition in their east London gallery. This unique exhibition encompasses both blankets crafted by PARIS ESSEX duo Carolyn Clewer and Tiphaine de Lussy and photographs composed by Danish born Photographer Louise Melchior.

We produced the ‘FLASH SIGHTINGS’ photographic prints on Fine Art Giclée Photorag paper to sit amongst the unique blankets which will be on show at TOBV gallery in May.

This ongoing photography and textile collaboration between Louise Melchior and Paris Essex has evolved over the past two years. Together they are interested in gently introducing the cosy, decorative and home-loving blankets to the outside world, but staying within ordinary and familiar surroundings.

Draped in colourful hand-crafted blankets, a cast of local men are invited to pose as pseudo-classical characters in a series of improvised Tableaux Vivants. Using the flash as an impromptu spotlight, the camera captures their grandiose posturing at the bottom of the garden.

The exhibition will run at The Old Bank Vault from May 1st to May 13th with private view and launch night of FLASH SIGHTINGS on Thursday May 3rd, 6.30pm

RSVP Here for private view night of FLASH SIGHTINGS!

 

The Artists

Paris Essex

Paris Essex A partnership between Carolyn Clewer, the Essex girl and Parisienne Tiphaine de Lussy, Paris Essex is the result of years of collaboration between the two knitwear and textiles specialists, which began over 20 years ago at the Royal College of Art. They share a visual language and are drawn to the materials, processes and pace of fashion, the continual reinvention and juxtaposition of ideas.

Louise Melchior

Danish born photographer Louise Melchior studied sculpture at Chelsea College of Art from where she graduated in 1997 and has since completed a Masters at Goldsmiths in photography. Melchior is preoccupied with the instantaneous nature of photography, and uses the camera as a tool for discovery. She is enthralled by insignificant monotonous and often transitory subjects found in her daily life. The collaborative work with Paris Essex stands in strong contrast to her other work, for one, her personal work shows evidence of human interaction but is purposely devoid of people. On the other hand elements reoccur such as the immediacy of the moment that was, the suggestive notion the image evokes, and the isolation of the subject matter.

 

The Prints

The large fine art gilcée prints were produced on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm using our online Self- Service system  – ideal for visual artists on a tight deadline or budget!

 

The Gallery 

At The Old Bank Vault works with independent suppliers, emerging and established artists to curate versatile collections to suit various personalities. Their London concept gallery fuses bespoke art, high end ‘Made in England’ fashion & Contemporary living.

 

 

ALL IMAGES © Louise Melchior

BLANKETS © PARIS ESSEX

 

The opening of a new exhibition takes place later this month; Devotion – A Portrait of Loretta is the latest exhibition from photographer Franklyn Rodgers in which he pays homage to a figure sacred in his life: his mother, Loretta.

Created over several years, the collection of images features Loretta and the circle of friends important to her. The detailed portraits draw attention to the significance of the close-knit relationships between these individuals and investigate what it means to look into the human face.

Drawing inspiration from the work of French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas, who claimed that our individual obligations and morality are found in the recognition of the suffering and mortality of others, Rodgers collection of images shows this in an act of devotion to his mother and the intimate familial moments of love, care, tenderness and affection in these relationships displayed.

Metro is delighted to be supporting Rodgers who utilised our Bespoke Service for the production and mounting of the C type prints for the exhibition.

 

Autograph ABP, Rivington Place, London, EC2A 3BA

Opening night: Thursday 26th April 6.30 – 8.30PM

Exhibition dates: 27 April – 7 July 2018

Gallery opening times: Tues, Wed and Fri: 11:00am – 6:00pm;

Thurs: 11:00am – 9:00pm; Sat: 12:00 – 6:00pm; Closed Sunday

Images © Franklyn Rodgers

  1. Mrs Loretta Rodgers – Crown, 2013
  2. Mrs Loretta Rodgers, 31 January 2006
  3. Myra German, July 2017
  4. Iris Simms, 2013

Metro is delighted to be working with neighbours the wonderful Curious Duke Gallery and supporting their prestigious Secret Art Prize.

As part of the collaboration we are offering a premier portfolio prize for the winner which includes; a one-to-one portfolio review with our creative director Steve Macleod, a guided tour of the production lab and a tailored session with a print technician to discuss and prepare your work for print production.

 

WHAT IS THE SECRET ART PRIZE?

The winner of Secret Art Prize 2018 has the opportunity to showcase their works within a dedicated space at Moniker Art Fair with curatorial support from both Moniker Art Fair and Curious Duke Gallery. They will earn full representation from Curious Duke Gallery, mentoring from CDG founder Eleni Duke, a £1000 cash prize and gifts from Jacksons Art and a portfolio review from Metro Imaging.

There will also be four runners up who will receive gifts from our sponsors, representation from Curious Duke Gallery

WHO CAN APPLY? 

The Secret Art Prize is open to all urban and contemporary artists. Disciplines welcome include painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking and photography. We do not accept film and performance pieces.

HOW TO APPLY?

A very simple question – just click here to find out.

WHAT IS THE PRIZE?

From Curious Duke Gallery

Curious Duke Gallery may have began in September 2011 as a pop up, in addition to the online gallery, but CDG now stands as a fully fledged ‘anti-gallery’. Curious Duke Gallery is currently London’s leading urban and contemporary art space for emerging artists.

– Representation

– Exhibition

– Mentoring with Director Eleni Duke

From Metro

Over 37 years in the photographic industry has taught us that every person who works here is as important as our clients. Our aim is for a flexible workforce with multi-skilled and cross-trained people so that our level of expertise is second to none.

– Premier Print + Portfolio Prize worth over £500

– Set of x10 portfolio prints based on our Premier Bespoke Service

– A guided lab and production tour

– A on-to-one portfolio review with Creative Director

– Tailored production advice with a Metro print technician

From Moniker Art Fair

Established in 2010, Moniker Art Fair has earned a reputation as one of the most exciting contemporary art fairs with it’s roots embedded in urban culture.

– A display of Art Work at Moniker Art Fair 4 – 7 October 2018

– The winning artist will be commissioned to make an installation art work which incorporates a collection of the winning artists work.

From Jackson’s Art Supplies

Jackson’s is a well-established maker and supplier of art materials. Their mission is to provide artists of all abilities with the paints, inks, paper, ideas and every tool imaginable to help them realise their creative potential.

– £150 worth of Jacksons fine art vouchers

– Editorial feature on the Jacksons Art Blog

Cash Prize

– The winning artist will receive a £1000 cash prize.

 

RUNNERS UP
There will also be four runners up. The runners up will receive an group exhibition with Curious Duke Gallery, mentoring with Eleni Duke and representation from Curious Duke Gallery.

PEOPLE’S CHOICE WINNER
There will also be the People’s Choice Award. The applicants will be long listed to 100 who will all go to the public vote, the winner of the public vote competition will be shortlisted straight to the final 10.

Find out more about Curious Duke Gallery here

Last Thursday  the all analogue print publication – PYLOT Magazine, launched their much anticipated 8th Issue, and Metro were delighted to collaborate with Fuji Film UK to support their pop-up exhibition.

Issue 8 focuses on ‘Autonomy’ explores themes such as: The attitude changes we experience during our teenage years, motherhood and the representation of women, the human relationship with technology and how it impacts upon our daily routines and decision-making processes, creative ways of subverting power in society, be that as a collective or on our own.

For the launch we have teamed up with Fuji to produce an exhibition of work from Issue 8 on Fujicolour Crystal Archive Professional Velvet. This paper is ideal for artist looking for a dead matt print on a true photographic digital C-Type paper.

Autonomy features contributions by: Ed Templeton, Andrea Riseborough, Billie JD Porter, Kira Bunse, Akram Khan, Raven Smith, Chris Killip, Marco Santucci, Matthias Steinkrause, RareBooksParis, Lanvin, TOGA, Mara Palena, and more.

 

Check out our Fuji Velvet C-type paper here and see more info on PYLOT issue #8 here.

Metro Imaging is delighted to launch its student photo award – THRESHOLD.

 

Open to all students at any level, we invite entrants to submit one piece of work that they feel defines their practice to date via this open theme.

 

Submissions will be judged by a panel of industry influencers (details below) who will choose one overall winner and five shortlisted winners. The panel will be looking for quality, context, and strong message within the submissions.

 

All six winners will be exhibited at Metro Imaging in central London throughout September 2018, with the overall winner announced on the opening night Tuesday 4th Septhember.

 

PRIZE:

One overall winner

  • x1 £1000 production credit to spend at Metro Imaging
  • x1 12 month tailored Mentorship at Metro Imaging
  • x1 work displayed as part of Metro Student Award

 

Five Shortlisted winners

  • x1 work displayed as part of Metro Student Award
  • x1 £50 Gift Vouchers for Metro Imaging

 

JUDGES:

  • Owen Harvey – award winning youth and subculture photographer.
  • Carole Evans – photographic artist, cultural organiser and educator.
  • Prof. Steve Macleod – creative director, photographic artist, master printer and educator.

 

REQUIREMNETS:

A single image you feel defines your practice to date

  • x1 Image (digital file)
  • x1 Paragraph that describes how this image sums up your practice to date (100 words MAX)

 

DEADLINE:

6pm Friday 29th of June 2018

 

ENTRY:

ENTRIES ARE NOW CLOSED

 

Once judging has been completed, we will be contacting the winning entrants directly in order to send their high res files for printing ahead of the September exhibition.

 

IMAGE CREDITS:

Printing at Metro Imaging lab

Skins + Suedes – Owen Harvey at Metro Front of House

The Precursor Project at Metro Front of House

 

Metro is thrilled to support South-African born, London-based artist Tamsin Relly for her part in a recent project for Hospital Rooms – an arts and mental health charity that commissions world class artists to transform locked and secure wards with museum quality and compliant artwork. This latest project is for Eileen Skellern 1, a psychiatric intensive care unit for women at Maudsley Hospital, South London.

World class artists including Julian Opie, Aimee Mullins, Paresha Amin, Nengi Omuku, Tim A Shaw, Harold Offeh and Tamsin Relly were invited to work in genuine partnership with patients and clinicians to co-produce museum quality and NHS compliant artworks for the unit, with the aim to radically transform the physical environment on the unit making it more conducive to recovery.

Tamsin works across a range of media – including painting, printmaking and drawing and the final piece for this project was created using Metro’s direct to media printer. After visiting the ward on a number of occasions Tamsin invited staff and service users to paint or draw their earliest memories of being in nature during creative arts workshops

In response, Tamsin designed the space recreating qualities of being immersed in a botanical environment. She created a vibrant jungle layered with vivid blooms that is placed on a hand painted backdrop of softened shapes in quieter tones. The mood varies within the work, offering different spaces to rest or dream in. While the sitting area leads onto the courtyard in the unit, access to nature is limited for patients.

“My hope was to draw on the restorative and meditative qualities of spending time surrounded by plants and nature and to try and bring feelings of the outdoors in – the seasons, the elements, life alive in the cycles of growth and expansion or rest and turning inwards” Tamsin explained.

With the assistance of Metro, Tamsin has also produced this work as a limited edition run of 25 unframed, Giclée prints. Proceeds from the sale of the prints will be donated exclusively to Hospital Rooms for their most urgent upcoming projects  – for more information about how to purchase the print click here.

Griffin Gallery, 21 Evesham Street, London, W11 4AJ

Private view: 25 April 2018, 6:00pm – 8:30pm RSVP here 

Viewing: 26 – 27 April, 10:00am – 5:00pm

Images ©

  1. Tamsin Relly, Testing ideas for ES1, 2017

  2. Tamsin Relly, Pink Shadow,  2017

  3. Tamsin Relly, Pink Shadow, Hospital Communal Lounge ES1, Courtesy of Hospital Rooms

  4. Nengi Omuku, Family Room ES1, Courtesy of Hospital Rooms

  5. Julian Opie, 4 Pigeons, Corridor ES1, Courtesy of Hospital Rooms

The winners of the British Journal of Photography’s International Photography Award 2018 are Copenhagen-based collective Sara, Peter & Tobias. The trio have won with their series ‘The Merge’, an in-depth exploration into artificial intelligence and robotics, which aims to explore and visually interpret the possibility that we are living inside a simulation.

The BJP IPA winner’s Sara GalbiatiPeter Helles Eriksen and Tobias Selnaes Markussen shared a studio but worked separately for several years before coming together to start a collaborative creative studio in 2013.

“Since forming their collective, Sara, Peter and Tobias have made a name for themselves with their first project and photobook, Phenomena. This debut project was an anthropological study of UFOs and extraterrestrials, and was exhibited at Rencontres d’Arles and nominated for Prix de la Photo FigaroIt introduced their conceptual and subjective approach, akin to documentary, which considers issues founded on theories and first-person accounts rather than fact. This unique approach has continued through to The Merge.” – Sarah Roberts , BJP , Mar 2018

As part of the IPA prizes Sara, Peter and Tobias have won an in-person review of their portfolio from expert team here at Metro Imaging as well as production of their solo exhibition in London.

‘The Merge’ will be exhibited in a solo exhibition at TJ Boulting Gallery from the 13th July to 11th August. The exhibition will be open to the public, and is an opportunity for people to come and see this seminal work for themselves.

You can read about Sara, Peter and Tobias work and practices in latest interview with the BJP here.

Stay tuned to the Metro Imaging newsletter for latest on BJP IPA 2018, including interview, Instagram takeover, behind the scenes with the production process and all info on the launch!

In the meantime you can see the exhibition we produced for BJP IPA 2017 winner Dani Castro Garcia and his exceptional project Foreigner at TJ Boulting last April.

All images from the series The Merge © Sara, Peter & Tobias

Metro is delighted to be supporting The Great British Seaside, a new exhibition which opens this week at the National Maritime Museum (NMM). It explores our changing relationship with the seaside over the last six decades and celebrates the ambiguities and absurdities of seaside life from abandoned piers to the dazzling arcades.

Documenting a quintessentially British experience the exhibition features over 100 images from the 1960’s to the present day by four of Britain’s most celebrated photographers,  Tony Ray-Jones, David Hurn,  Simon Roberts and Martin Parr. Metro has produced bespoke frames for the images on show as well as C-type and black and white fibre prints.

Each photographer brings their own individuality to the exhibition which includes images from the archival collections of each photographer, plus previously unseen films and 20 new works by Martin Parr, commissioned by the NMM and shot in the summer of 2017.  The new images focus on the thriving and diverse resorts of London’s ‘local beaches’, including Southend-on-Sea, Shoeburyness, Leigh-on-Sea, Frinton-on-Sea, Clacton-on-Sea and Walton-on-the-Naze.

Through recurring themes of place, tradition and class, this fun and fascinating exhibition holds up a critical, yet affectionate and often humorous mirror to a great British tradition and features beaches from Brighton to Blackpool capturing the traditions, customs and eccentricities associated with them.

 

National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London

Exhibition dates: 23rd March–30th September 2018

Opening times: 10:00am – 5:00pm daily

Entrance fee: Adult: £10.35 | Child: £4.50 | Concession: £9.45

For more information about the exhibition

Images:

  1. GB.England, Dorset, From West Bay.-1996 © Martin Parr – Magnum Photos
  2. GB.England. Herne Bay, Kent. 1963 © David Hurn – Magnum Photos
  3. Eastbourne, East Sussex c 1968 © Tony Ray-Jones – National Science and Media Museum
  4. Blackpool Promenade, Lancashire. 2008 © Simon Roberts. Courtesy Flowers Gallery, London
  5. Whistling Sand, Pothoer, Aberdaron 2004 © David Hurn – Magnum Photos

 

 

 

 

British artist and photographer Valda Bailey recently revealed her latest work ‘The Sun Beyond the Shadow’ at MMX Gallery, London, with a beautiful collection of mixed media glass pieces, and here at Metro we were delighted to be involved.

Bailey – greatly informed by her background in painting – utilises contemporary printing techniques with ancient crafts to produce painterly, dream-like images. Her artistic direction leans towards the Japanese concept of Wabi-sabi, celebrating the beauty of imperfection, and aligns perfectly with the uniquely-produced final prints.

These exceptional pieces were printed here at Metro Imaging using Direct To Media (DTM) technology: printing onto any flat substrate up to 8 x 10ft and 4” thick with archival UV ink. Valda’s painting-like photographs were printed on the reverse of AR Museum-grade glass, and then hand finished with gold, silver or copper leaf, giving each print its own unique style. The end result is ethereal layered prints.

“The prevailing aesthetic today, that of theoretically-driven conceptual photography interests me far less, than creating a compelling orchestration of colour and form within the frame. My fascination with color goes back a long way. One of my earliest creative recollections has me sitting at a table endlessly mixing paints in a valiant but ultimately futile attempt to ‘invent a new color’. It was an imperative that kept me occupied for some time as I recall. The result was always the same – and unedifying fudge of pale peach and silver. In my defense, I was very young at the time. Scientific fundamentals had yet to impinge on my consciousness and as I could barely read, I certainly hadn’t come across Goethe’s colour theory, nor the writings of Josef Albers.” – Valda Bailey.

 

Exhibition Dates: 9 February – 10 March 2018

MMX GALLERY
448 New Cross Road
London
SE14 6TY

For all available work and prices, please contact the gallery directly or write to: info@mmxgallery.com

 

Image Credits: Valda Bailey ‘The Sun Beyond the Shadow’ Installation Shots at MMX Gallery, courtesy of Metro Imaging

Daniel Shea’s new book ’43-35 10th Street’ is about architecture and its relationship to ideological and socioeconomic shifts.

We were delighted to work with Daniel to produce a selection of giclée mounted prints, exhibited at the Webber Gallery, London to coincide with the book launch this March.

The work began with a simple premise; for Shea to observe the residential real estate boom in his neighbourhood of New York City, Long Island City. This type of development boom, happening in cities globally, is a distinctly late capitalist solution to the perception of housing needs.

Images of Long Island City in New York are juxtaposed with the government buildings in the famed Brazilian city of Brasilia, built ex-nihilo 50 years ago. Images of a dying California industrial town suggest a cycle of dissolution, real estate value, and entropy.

Architectural forms, from disparate places and historical moments, evolve and echo. If modernist architecture reflected a utopia of civic engagement, neoliberalism’s departure comes in the form of a utopia of consumer engagement.

Establishing the studio as a site of artistic production, surrounded by a different form of labor that builds cities, he aims to construct an analogy between his own mobility and the macro flow of capital that is ever present in our globalized world.

Daniel Shea’s  43-35 10th ST work will be on show at Webber London form 22 March until 4 May 2018.

Hi folks,

We’ll be closed from 6.30pm Thursday 29th March until 8.30am Tuesday 3rd April for the Easter break.

The easter bank holidays will affect working day turnaround times, so if you’re looking for photographic prints before the 28th make sure you get those orders in quick.

Just use one of our tailored and trusted services to order your work online or in-lab:

Bespoke Photo Printing

Bespoke is our classic service, you sit back and we do the work. Come in, or send us your files via our Uploader, Dropbox or Wetransfer with your instructions and we can resize, crop, add borders, colour correct and adjust according to your instructions. Or come in and work on a one to one basis with our expert technicians to get exactly the ‘directed printing’ results you want, plus be looked after by a dedicated production manager

 

Self-service Photo Printing

Our great value Online printing, mounting and framing solution is the go-to-service. If you feel confident in preparing your own files for print, then simply upload your images and follow the simple steps to make your top quality prints. Add mounting and framing if you require. Complete your order with secure online payment. Couldn’t be easier!

 

Contact us for more info or follow us on Instagram, Twitter + Facebook for updates.

 

Happy Easter!