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How will women be remembered over the past 100 years? What have they achieved in the fields of Sport, Science, Politics, the Arts and Education? Who were these women and what did they look like?

Renowned photographer Anita Corbin aims to answer these questions with her symbolic project ‘First Women‘, exhibiting at Royal College of Art this summer.

This considerable body of work comprises a unique collection of 100 portraits capturing women in the UK who were “first” in their field of achievement. The portraits by Anita provide inspiration and insight for a new generation of women seeking an understanding of their own roles in a rapidly changing world in which equality is still an issue. The full collection is finally being revealed this year to mark 100 years of women’s suffrage.

After working with Metro on her 2016 exhibition Visible Girls, Anita was keen to seek advice on the First Women project from Metro’s Director Steve Macleod and Marketing Manager, Kate O’Neill.  Anita comments “Their (Metro’s) dedicated team of experts have a huge range of industry experience and they clearly love what they do, which is why the quality is so good – I can totally rely on them”.

“From our first project with Anita working on Visible Girls to this landmark body of ‘100 First Women’, our partnership has progressed and grown into a collaboration beyond what we could have ever hoped for. We look forward to creating many more projects with Anita and adding to the Metro Imaging legacy of high quality and close collaboration with our clients.” – Kate O’Neill says of the ongoing partnership with Anita and First Women.

Steve Macleod adds  “This project embodies Anita’s huge dedication and determination to her craft in collating these portraits which are emblematic of the commitment to her practise or process.”

Working closely with Anita over the last year, our experienced technicians have helped to produce this landmark exhibition via archival digital c-type matt prints, custom mounting and bespoke framing.

First Women, The Collection, is about women’s achievements, and one woman’s exploration through the camera lens that endeavours to answer the question: How will women be remembered over the past 100 years? What have they achieved in the fields of Sport, Science, Politics, the Arts and Education? And who were these remarkable “first” women, what did they look like?

The portraits are multi-tiered; they are an exploration of the relationship between the photographer and the sitter as well as the relationship the woman has with the environment or background in which she is photographed. Each has been carefully chosen by Anita and her subject to reflect the field of achievement in which the woman has excelled.

First Women is the project that Anita has waited all her life to create. Her passion was born out of work she began in the early eighties – her Visible Girls portfolio was symbolic of women’s newfound freedom to be whoever they wanted to be – and fired by years spent working as a top female photographer for The Sunday Times and The Observer when she was often sent to cover “human interest” stories involving women.

All this experience has culminated in Anita’s vision – the creation of a legacy for future generations of women to enable them to understand and appreciate the achievements of their forebears – and perhaps even to laugh incredulously that once upon a time women were regarded as second-class citizens without a vote.

 

The exhibition launches this July at the Royal College of Art (info below) and you can get involved and support this remarkable project here!

 

 

The exhibition of the full 100 portraits shows at the Dyson Gallery, Royal College of Art, Riverside, 1 Hester Road London SW11 4AN 20th July until 22nd August.

Every day of the week 12-5pm. Free Entry.

 

 

IMG © Anita Corbin / First Women

1. Kelly Gallagher, First Woman to win British Winter Paralympic gold

2. Nicola Adams MBE, First Woman win British Olympic and European Games boxing gold

3. Suzi Quatro, First Woman to play bass in and front a Glam Rock Band

4. Rev Rose Hudson Wilkin, First Woman to be made the Speaker’s Chaplain

Come down to explore our South London workshop, and join us for a framing and curating coffee morning. Meet the experts behind every piece we create and discover cost-effective and archival solutions for finishing, preserving and installing artworks.

We will also be joined by our industry partners, TAGSMART – pioneers in digital tagging, authentication and certification services in the Art Market.

Through live demonstrations, gain tips on curating and exhibiting over coffee and refreshments. Plus, get a chance to win a £250 voucher for our Mounting and Framing services.

We’re looking forward to your visit!

Event Details:

Tuesday 3rd July
11 am – 1 pm

Metro Framing HQ
106 Tinworth Street
Vauxhall, London
SE11 5EQ

To join us, RSVP here

Photography organisation that offers support, and networking for creative photographers worldwide. We work with them to provide opportunities to promote their work and make new connections via meetups, talks, and exhibitions.

Join us on Wednesday June 20th for an afternoon of

Rediscovered Photographs at Calvert 22 Foundation.

 

WHAT?

Print swap, exhibition tour, and portfolio review with The Calvert Journal and Metro Imaging.

We’ll begin with a curator’s tour of the exhibition Family Values: Polish Photography Now, the first major exhibition dedicated to Polish photography in the UK, which amplifies themes of identity, home and family in the context of social and political change.

The tour will be followed by a print swap introduced by Kate O’Neill of Metro Imaging. The print swap’s theme is “Rediscovered Photographs”, inspired by the work of the photographers in the Family Values exhibition.

A group career review session with award winning photographer Owen Harvey and Kate O’Neill, Marketing and Partnerships Manager at Metro Imaging, will follow.

Finally, you’ll have the chance to participate in one-on-one portfolio review sessions with editors of The Calvert Journal.

WHEN?

2pm – 5pm Wednesday 20th June 2018.

WHERE?

Calvert 22 Foundation, 22 Calvert Avenue, London E2 7JP

REQUIREMENTS?

Attendees must book a space and bring along one of their own photographic prints that fits the theme “Rediscovered Photographs”. It can be an image from their own personal archive of work; one that never made the final cut for a series or project; one that had been forgotten about; a mistake (happy or otherwise) that was kept regardless; or a photograph that otherwise fits the theme. Your photo can be as large or as small as you like, but we recommend prints around 10″ x 8″ or 10″ x 12″ in size.

Your photo can be an already existing print, or you can order one via Metro Imaging Self-Service and receive 20% off any paper and print size. A discount code will be provided to you once you book your place. You can order your prints here.

BOOKING?

Entry is free but there are a limited number of spaces, so be sure to book your place here!

Getty Images Gallery announces Beat Positive, a new exhibition which will bring to life the dawn of hip-hop culture in a series of vibrant photographs available as fine art prints. The exhibition showcases iconic images from British photographers Janette Beckman and David Corio alongside never before seen material from the Michael Ochs, Right On! and Redferns archives.

Now one of the biggest selling musical genres globally, hip-hop began with a much simpler goal: to get people moving. On the evening of August 11, 1973, Clive Campbell, better known as DJ Kool Herc, set up two turntables in the recreation room at 1520 Sedgewick Ave in the Bronx in order to entertain the crowd gathered for his sister Cindy’s birthday party. In a completely new technique he called the Merry Go-Round, Herc extended short drum breaks, now known as breakbeats, using two copies of the same records. The crowd went wild, the party went late, and though no one at the time was aware, a new genre was born.

Londoners Janette Beckman and David Corio first discovered hip-hop in 1982 while on assignment for music magazines such as NME, Melody Maker, and The Face. Their portraits of Run DMC, Slick Rick, Salt ‘n’ Pepa, Whodini, Grandmaster Flash, LL Cool J, Queen Latifah and the Beastie Boys, along with many others, are considered classics of the genre. Their work has been shown internationally at museums and galleries such as the Victoria and Albert Museum, The Museum of the City of New York and Powerhouse Gallery.

Using the four main elements of hip-hop – turntablism, MC’ing, graffiti writing, and breakdancing – as a jumping off point, Getty Images Gallery curator Shawn Waldron worked with the two photographers to create a unique offering of limited edition prints. The show also features never-before-seen historic photographs sourced from Getty Images’ extensive archive, including images of a young LL Cool J, a triptych of The Fat Boys filming their ‘Jail House Rap’ video and the 1984 Hip Hop Jam at London’s Southbank, taken from the Michael Ochs, Right On! and Redferns archives respectively.

Working closely with the Getty Images Gallery team, Metro produced both digital black & white fibre prints along with digital c-type matt prints for this new exhibition of vintage work, which is on show now until 4th August 2018.

Images from the exhibition are available for purchase as prints, starting at £75, with global delivery options. The Getty Images Gallery will also be producing a 1980s style fanzine also called Beat Positive that will be available for purchase exclusively through the Gallery.

 

IMG ©  Getty Images
1. Stetsasonic – The group Stetsasonic poses on a Brooklyn, New York sidewalk, 1988 Photo by Janette Beckman/Getty Images
2. NEW YORK – 1989: (L-R) Rapper Flavor Flav, director Spike Lee and Chuck D of the rap group ‘Public Enemy’ film a video for their song ‘Fight The Power’ directed by Spike Lee in 1989 in New York, New York. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
3. American hip hop duo Eric B. (right) and Rakim walking across 14th Street in New York City, circa 1989. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
4. Beastie Boys and Run-DMC performing on stage at the Greek Theatre, Los Angeles, 21st June 1987. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

This month sees ‘Tish Murtha: Works 1976 – 1991’ exhibited at The Photographers’ Gallery, London. This unique exhibition, which charts the remarkable accomplishments of documentary photographer Tish Murtha, also offers a tender and frank perspective on a historic moment of social deprivation and instability in Britain.

In 1976, aged 20, Tish Murtha left Newcastle upon Tyne to study at the influential School of Documentary Photography at Newport College of Art under the guidance of Magnum photographer David Hurn. The earliest series in this show, Newport Pub, dates from this period – where Murtha photographed the realities of everyday life for the regulars of a typical public house, ‘The New Found Out’ in a deprived area.

Murtha felt a genuine sense of obligation to the communities of her home in the North East and had chosen a course of study which would make her a more effective photographer, one who could highlight the social disadvantages that she herself had suffered.

To honour Murtha’s ethos the exhibition, co-curated by Val Williams and Gordon MacDonald, with Karen McQuaid, surveys six major bodies of work; Newport Pub (1976/78); Elswick Kids (1978); Juvenile Jazz Bands (1979); Youth Unemployment (1980); London by Night (1983) and Elswick Revisited (1987 – 1991) using both vintage and contemporary prints. In addition, the exhibition will also include personal letters and ephemeral material from the Tish Murtha Archive.

Metro Imaging have had the privilege of working with Tish’s daughter Ella Murtha over the past year, initially digitising part of the archive and then printing for this retrospective show. Ella chose silver gelatin black and white fibre prints to emulate and reference her mother’s way of working.

‘Tish Murtha: Works 1976 – 1991’ will open at The Photographers’ Gallery on June 15th alongside Alex Prager: Silver Lake Drive, a mid-career survey of American photographer and filmmaker, Alex Prager.

 

IMAGES © Tish Murtha Archive, with thanks to Ella Murtha